CM News

  • posted on November 30, 2016 1:36pm

    The MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction (SPDC) held its 10th Industry Seminar Series event on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, in East Lansing. Featured speaker was Sam Cummings, principal and managing partner of CWD Real Estate Investment, who presented on the “History of Revitalization of Downtown Grand Rapids.”

    Joseph Maguire, president and CEO of Wolverine Development Corporation, and president and co-founder of the Society of Environmentally Responsible Facilities (SERF), is the facilitator of the Series. The series continues to be popular with local alumni and industry leaders, and helps to show SPDC students real-world examples of what is possible to achieve upon graduation.

  • posted on October 12, 2016 1:09pm

    The MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction (SPDC) is hosting the 10th Industry Seminar Series event Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, at the Human Ecology Building on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing.

    The featured speaker is Sam Cummings, principal and managing partner of CWD Real Estate Investment. He will present on “Downtown Grand Rapids Revitalization.” Cummings has dedicated the last 25 years of his life to the preservation of the City’s history and revitalization of the community through the built environment. One by one, he has brought back to life some of Grand Rapids’ most historic treasures and long-neglected buildings. Today, CWD is working to bring new vision, vibrancy and vitality to the urban core and community.

  • posted on August 23, 2016 8:43am

    How might the state recycle more home construction materials, especially given the number of blighted homes here? Two Spartans, a researcher and a faculty member, discuss the challenges and benefits of a stronger effort.

    On this week’s Current State environmental segment, we talk recycling in Michigan. It’s a relevant issue in Michigan because of the removal of many blighted homes in Detroit, Flint and Lansing.

    We talk with Lauren Ross, a researcher at the Michigan State University Center for Community and Economic Development who wrote a story about this topic recently for Bridge Magazine, and George Berghorn, an Assistant Professor of Construction Management at Michigan State University. [Listen to CM Assistant Professor George Berghorn’s interview with WKAR about Michigan recycling.]

  • posted on July 16, 2016 1:03pm

    Dong Zhao, PhD, assistant professor of Construction Management, Michigan State University, led a study that found that found that more than 50 percent of potential energy savings from energy efficient homes can be lost if users don’t know how to use the buildings properly. Zhao said this is a concern both for individual homeowners, as well as for commercial property owners.

  • posted on June 20, 2016 10:54am

    New research out of Michigan State University has found that more than 50 per cent of potential energy savings from energy efficient homes can be lost if users don’t know how to use the buildings properly.

    A study, published in Procedia Engineering, found that incorrect use of airconditioners, thermostats, ventilation and humidity control could have a dramatic effect on predicted energy savings from efficient homes.

    “Technological advances in building and equipment account for only 43 per cent of energy consumption,” MSU assistant professor and study author Dong Zhao said. “That means that you could buy the greenest house on the market, yet your personal habits could waste more than 50 per cent of your energy savings.”

  • posted on June 8, 2016 9:35am

    A well-insulated home with a high-efficiency air conditioner and programmable thermostat are only as effective as the person using it.

    A new study led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Procedia Engineering shows that people living in green dwellings who don’t maximize their technology can lose half of the energy savings available to them.

    “Technological advances in building and equipment account for only 42 percent of energy consumption,” said Dong Zhao, assistant professor in MSU’s School of Planning, Design and Construction. “That means that you could buy the greenest house on the market, yet your personal habits could waste more than 50 percent of your energy savings.”

  • posted on June 8, 2016 9:04am

    A well-insulated home with a high-efficiency air conditioner and programmable thermostat are only as effective as the person using it. A new study shows that people living in green dwellings who don’t maximize their technology can lose half of the energy savings available to them.

  • posted on June 8, 2016 8:58am

    EAST LANSING, Mich. - A well-insulated home with a high-efficiency air conditioner and programmable thermostat are only as effective as the person using it.

    A new study led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Procedia Engineering shows that people living in green dwellings who don’t maximize their technology can lose half of the energy savings available to them.

    “Technological advances in building and equipment account for only 43 percent of energy consumption,” said Dong Zhao, assistant professor in MSU‘s School of Planning, Design and Construction. “That means that you could buy the greenest house on the market, yet your personal habits could waste more than 50 percent of your energy savings.”

    As summer heats up and air conditioners kick on, this could be a concern for individual homeowners as well as commercial property owners managing business and residential occupants.

  • posted on June 8, 2016 8:47am

    A well-insulated home with a high-efficiency air conditioner and programmable thermostat are only as effective as the person using it.

    A new study led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Procedia Engineering shows that people living in green dwellings who don’t maximize their technology can lose half of the  available to them.

    “Technological advances in building and equipment account for only 43 percent of ,” said Dong Zhao, assistant professor in MSU‘s School of Planning, Design and Construction. “That means that you could buy the greenest house on the market, yet your personal habits could waste more than 50 percent of your  savings.”

    As summer heats up and air conditioners kick on, this could be a concern for individual homeowners as well as commercial property owners managing business and residential occupants.

  • posted on June 8, 2016 8:39am

    EAST LANSING, Mich.—A well-insulated home with a high-efficiency air conditioner and programmable thermostat are only as effective as the person using it.

    A new study led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Procedia Engineering shows that people living in green dwellings who don’t maximize their technology can lose half of the energy savings available to them.

    “Technological advances in building and equipment account for only 43 percent of energy consumption,” said Dong Zhao, assistant professor in MSU‘s School of Planning, Design and Construction. “That means that you could buy the greenest house on the market, yet your personal habits could waste more than 50 percent of your energy savings.”

    As summer heats up and air conditioners kick on, this could be a concern for individual homeowners as well as commercial property owners managing business and residential occupants.

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