URP News

  • posted on November 20, 2016 12:51pm

    Joel Arnold, a recent Michigan State University graduate with degrees in social relations and policy from James Madison College and urban and regional planning from the College of Social Science; and Margaret Born, an Honors College senior majoring in comparative cultures and politics in James Madison College and Arabic in the College of Arts and Letters, are two of 12 students in the country to earn the Mitchell Scholarship, which is a competitive graduate school scholarship.

    Arnold and Born are two of the three Mitchell Scholars from MSU. The last Mitchell Scholar from MSU was selected in 2001.

    The U.S.-Ireland Alliance established the George J. Mitchell Scholarship Program, which allows up to 12 future American leaders to pursue a year of graduate study in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    “Congratulations to Joel and Margaret on receiving this prestigious recognition,” said MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon. “As Spartans, they have the talent and tenacity to make an extraordinary impact. I join the entire MSU community in wishing Joel and Margaret good luck on their journeys to make the world a better place.”

  • posted on November 2, 2016 11:34am

    Michigan State University has four finalists for a pair of highly competitive graduate school scholarships – two for the Mitchell Scholarship and two for the Rhodes Scholarship.

    MSU’s Mitchell Scholarship finalists are: Joel Arnold, a recent graduate with degrees in social relations and policy from James Madison College and urban and regional planning from the College of Social Science; and Margaret Born, an Honors College senior majoring in comparative cultures and politics in James Madison College and Arabic in the College of Arts and Letters.

    The U.S.-Ireland Alliance established the George J. Mitchell Scholarship Program, which allows up to 12 future American leaders to pursue a year of graduate study in Ireland and Northern Ireland. MSU has produced one Mitchell Scholar to date.

    “I am honored to have been named a national finalist in this very competitive process,” Arnold said. “Applying for the Mitchell has allowed me to explore more deeply my passion for struggling communities and what I can do to impact these communities in a positive manner while learning from and with the people of Ireland.”

  • posted on October 27, 2016 10:40am

    The MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction (SPDC) held its ninth Industry Seminar Series event on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in East Lansing. Featured speaker Scott Adams, deputy city manager for the City of Las Vegas, and a MSU urban planning alumnus (1977), presented on “MSU, Urban Planning and Cities: A Career Perspective.” Professor Mark Wilson, program leader for the MSU Urban & Regional Planning Program, was the facilitator for this event. The series continues to be popular with local alumni and industry leaders, and helps to show SPDC students real-world examples of what is possible to achieve upon graduation.

    In his role for the City of Las Vegas, Adams oversees the departments of Economic and Urban Development, Community Services, Cultural Affairs, and Parks and Recreation. He also serves as the operations officer for the Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency. Adams is a certified manager with the International City Managers Association; a member of the International Economic Development Council and the Urban Land Institute; and a past member of the American Institute of Certified Planners.

     

  • posted on October 17, 2016 2:27pm

    The “unequivocal value” of sustainable urban development was a major “take home” message from Scott Adams, deputy city manager for the City of Las Vegas, who recently visited MSU as a guest of the School of Planning, Design and Construction (SPDC).

    In both a speech to SPDC students and faculty and a follow-up interview for Greening of the Great Lakes, Adams underscored the Las Vegas commitment to a green planning ethos.

    “Sustainability is part of the DNA for the City of Las Vegas,” Adams said. “By next year, Las Vegas will be one of the few cities in the world where our entire city government will be 100% driven by renewable energy supplies.”

    “We have crossed over in American where looking at green buildings is a now a matter of economic reality . . . it is a bottom line thing. As planners, we no longer have to defend sustainable development; in fact, developers are embracing green building.” [Listen to Scott Adams, deputy city manager for the City of Las Vegas, interview with Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes.]

  • posted on October 11, 2016 11:33am

    Urban planning at Michigan State University is the oldest program in the country,” Mark Wilson tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes. “We have over 65 years of experience teaching about urban planning.

    “It’s a popular major because we find that so many students today are interested in what is going to happen to the cities of the future. Increasingly there is a theme of sustainability that runs through their interest.”

    Wilson is a professor and program leader of the Urban and Regional Planning program in MSU‘s School of Planning, Design and Construction.

    He says that urban planners have always been concerned about sustainability. [Listen to Urban & Regional Planning Professor and Program Leader Mark Wilson’s interview with Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes.]

  • posted on October 7, 2016 12:02pm

    Six students from Michigan State University have been nominated for three highly competitive graduate school scholarships – the Marshall Scholarship, the Mitchell Scholarship and the Rhodes Scholarship.

    All three awards support U.S. citizens attending graduate school in the United Kingdom or Ireland.

    Among the nominees for the Marshall Scholarship is Joel Arnold, a recent graduate with degrees in social relations and policy from the James Madison College and urban and regional planning from the College of Social Science; Rebecca Carlson, an Honors College senior majoring in chemical engineering from the College of Engineering; and Clara Lepard, an Honors College senior majoring in zoology from the College of Natural Sciences.

     

  • posted on September 6, 2016 2:24pm

    The MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction (SPDC) is hosting the 9th Industry Seminar Series event Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, at the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing. The featured speaker is Scott Adams, deputy city manager for the City of Las Vegas. He is a 1977 MSU urban planning alumnus, and will present on “MSU, Urban Planning and Cities: A Career Perspective.”

  • posted on August 31, 2016 10:40am

    Students from the Urban & Regional Planning Program (URP) in the MSU School of Planning, Design and Construction will present their Practicum projects on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016, at the Innovate Michigan! Summit 2016, which takes place at the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center in East Lansing. This event is hosted by the University Center for Regional Economic Innovation. Join economic developers, entrepreneurs, business leaders, investors, scholars, students, local and state government, and other community leaders for a day-long event featuring presentations from REI’s 2016 innovative economic development projects—current and potential tools, models, policies, programs, student projects, and Michigan inventions. To register and learn more, visit: Innovate Michigan! Summit 2016.

  • posted on August 7, 2016 7:00am

    ONCE UPON A time, hosting the Olympics seemed like a good idea for Rio de Janeiro. The games would provide a catalyst for much-needed infrastructure improvements, complete with funding and must-meet deadlines.

    But when the Olympic torch lit the cauldron in Maracana Stadium on Friday night, many Brazilians surely wondered, “How did we get such a raw deal?”

    As the 2016 Summer Games begin, the city’s transportation system is hardly ideal: Transit lines that benefit the middle and upper classes, rather than the people who need them most. A subway system delayed by cost overruns and untested as hundreds of thousands of people descend on the city. Walls that shield visitors from favelas—too bad if you actually live in one of them. Olympics infrastructure projects displaced 77,000 Rio residents, Smith College economist Andrew Zimablist estimates. . .

    [URP Associate Professor Eva Kassens-Noor discusses some of the challenges of transportation planning in Rio prior to the start of the Olympics.]

  • posted on August 2, 2016 11:17am

    You’ve probably heard the term “urban sprawl” before. But it may have been a while since the last time you heard it, and it may be difficult to put your finger on exactly what it means in the first place.

    There are good reasons for that. Detroit planning director Maurice Cox says Metro Detroiters have been living with urban sprawl for over a generation.

    “At this point, so many resources have been invested into configuring lifestyles for how people live, work and play around the automobile and highway infrastructure,” Cox says, “that we’ve come not even to question it. Entire generations have grown up in it and know no other urban paradigm.”

    So what is urban sprawl, exactly?

    Wayne Beyea, an outreach specialist in the Michigan State University School of Planning, Design and Construction, describes it as development in “places that are otherwise not properly served by infrastructure and the critical mass for successful urban development.” 
     
    In Metro Detroit sprawl dates back to the late 1960s, when residents began to flee the central city for outer-ring suburbs. That trend grew steadily over the ensuing decades, fueled by federally-subsidized highway expansion and housing development combined with racial tensions. Within forty years, hundreds of square miles of rural countryside were transformed into suburbia. . . [Urban & Regional Planning specialist Wayne Beyea talks about fighting back against urban sprawl]

     

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